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50 year old Nolasco Emanuel Biabato has a liquor shop where he sells palm wine. He used to be the chairman of the Tanzania Albino Society and a coordinator at the Skin Cancer Research Institute. Although he has seen many albinos die from skin cancer and knows everything about albino discrimination, he is confident that living conditions for albinos will improve in the near future. "Our president has recently appointed an albino member of parliament. That is an important sign," he says. "Education and information are the best ways to make a difference." Discrimination against albinos is a serious problem throughout sub-Saharan Africa, but recently in Tanzania albinos have been killed and mutilated, victims of a growing criminal trade in albino body parts fuelled by superstition and greed. Limbs, skin, hair, genitals and blood are believed by witch doctors to bring good luck, and are sold to clients for large sums of money, carrying with them the promise of instant wealth.